Orginal Research
2019 April
Volume : 7 Issue : 2


Can serum biomarkers prognosticate out come of traumatic brain injury (TBI)?

Raghavendra H, Varsha KS, Shivendar Sobti, Bhaskar S, Ajay Choudary, Gupta LN, Anubhuti

Pdf Page Numbers :- 43-50

Raghavendra H1,2*, Varsha KS3, Shivendar Sobti4, Bhaskar S5, Ajay Choudary1, Gupta LN1 and Anubhuti6

 

1Department of Neurosurgery, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, New Delhi, India

2Department of Neurosurgery, ESIC Medical College and Superspeciality Hospital, Hyderabad, Telangana, India

3Department of Anaesthesia, ESIC Medical College and Superspeciality Hospital, Hyderabad, Telangana, India

4Department of Neurosurgery, Christian Medical College & Hospital, Ludhiana, Punjab, India

5Department of Neurosurgery, All India Institute of Medical Sciences(AIIMS), Jodhpur, Rajasthan, India

6Department of Biochemistry, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, New Delhi, India

 

*Corresponding author: Dr. Raghavendra H, Department of Neurosurgery, ESIC Medical College and Superspeciality Hospital, Hyderabad -500038, Telangana, India. Email: harpanahalli.raghavendra@gmail.com

 

Received 3 January 2019; Revised 12 March 2019; Accepted 19 March 2019; Published 28 March 2019

 

Citation: Raghavendra H, Varsha KS, , Sobti S, Bhaskar S, Choudary A, Gupta LN, Anubhuti. Can serum biomarkers prognosticate out come of traumatic brain injury (TBI)?. J Med Sci Res. 2019; 7(2):43-50. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17727/JMSR.2019/7-9

 

Copyright: © 2019 Raghavendra H et al. Published by KIMS Foundation and Research Center. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

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Abstract

Background: Studies regarding ability of serum markers to provide an early insight related to functional outcome of patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) are limited.

Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP) and S100B protein concentration in serum to predict outcome after traumatic brain injury.

Methods and materials: Serum from 49 patients with traumatic brain injury (admission Glasgow Coma Scale ≤12) admitted in tertiary hospital for a period of one year was enrolled in study. All patients underwent an admission computed tomography (CT) scan as a part of their clinical evaluation. Serum levels of S100B & GFAP was measured using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay techniques. Demographic and outcome (Glasgow Outcome Scales) at 6th month of injury data were collected prospectively.

Results: Serum levels of S100B and GFAP were elevated following TBI. Injury severity score showed significant positive Pearson’s correlation with S100B, but not with GFAP levels. GOS score at 6th month had significant negative correlation with S100B & GFAP levels. Median serum levels of GFAP & S100B were found to have increased in those patients who were dead compared to those alive, and likewise in patients with an unfavourable outcome compared to those with a favourable outcome. The Mann-Whitney test showed the statistical significance of the above results. Univariate logistic regression analysis revealed that both GFAP & S100B could help predict the outcome, along with GCS & CT scan brain. Multivariable analysis showed that S100B was the strongest in predicting outcome at 6 months of TBI (P<0.05).

Conclusion: Serum levels of S100B and GFAP indicate the severity of brain damage and are correlated with neurological prognosis after TBI and may enhance prognostication when combined with clinical and radiological variables.

 

Keywords: Traumatic brain injury (TBI); Glasgow coma scale (GCS); biomarkers; Glasgow outcome scales (GOS)

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